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Michelin-Listed Ramen Restaurant Teams Up with Mister Donut

Michelin-Listed Ramen Restaurant Teams Up with Mister Donut

Mister Donut adds cold noodles from the Soranoiro ramen restaurant

Mister Donut has teamed up with Bib Gourmand ramen restaurant Soranoiro for two new cold noodle dishes for summer.

Brooklyn already has spaghetti doughnuts, but Japan’s enormously popular Mister Donut chain has teamed up with a Michelin-listed ramen restaurant to add some noodles to its own menu offerings.

According to Rocket News 24, Mister Donut has teamed up with the Soranoiro ramen restaurant, which earned “Bib Gourmand” status in the latest Tokyo Michelin Guide. Bib Gourmand listings indicate top-quality meals under $44, and it’s a mark of high esteem.

On April 26, select Mister Donut stores in Japan will begin serving two cold noodle dishes by Soranoiro. Both are called “Veggie Cool Breeze Noodles” and both feature flat, chewy noodles kneaded with paprika to make them brightly colored. One version comes in a sweet, carrot-based soup with five different kinds of vegetables and a bit of spicy yuzukoshō paste, which is made from chili peppers, yuzu peel, and salt. The second dish sees the same noodles served topped with chopped, semi-dried tomatoes with a tomato and soy milk dipping sauce. Both are served cold, and they will be in stores through the summer and will disappear again at the end of August.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


How to Be a Frugal Foodie in Japan

Disclosures
Many of the listings that appear on this website are from companies which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not review or include all companies or all available products. Thrifty Nomads has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Thrifty Nomads and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.

Whenever people try to tell me how expensive food is in Japan, my first query is whether they've been there – which, 9 times out of 10, they haven't – making me want to do this:

I heard there's a restaurant that's $150 a plate there”, “in that country, eating out is like the cost of family vacation”.

Ask yourself this: aren't these sort of outlandish statements true of a city near you? In just about every place in the globe, there can be found exorbitantly priced dining. Just two days ago we ate at a Montreal steakhouse that had a $24,000 bottle of champagne on the menu. What. But our meal was – drum roll please – $25.

Basically, eating cheap comes down to this: are you willing to do a bit of leg work and a smidgen of research? Can you read a menu, check prices, and resist the urge to walk like an impulsive zombie into the first restaurant you see? If yes, then you my friend have what it takes to be a thrifty nomad in Japan.

Final case in point: the first two weeks in Japan we spent no more than $3 per meal – that's almost as little as we were spending in South America. It can be done – and it's really not hard. So, you ready? Here's how to eat cheap in Japan.


Watch the video: MICHELIN STAR INSTANT RAMEN?! (November 2021).