New recipes

CDC Warns Against 'Cannibal' Sandwiches

CDC Warns Against 'Cannibal' Sandwiches

Raw meat sandwiches sicken diners in the Midwest

Wikimedia/Dezidor

The CDC is urging people to avoid the 'cannibal sandwich' this holiday season.

The "cannibal sandwich," a Midwest holiday snack for the most committed of meat lovers, has shocked the nation's health officials, who are recommending that nobody eat them ever.

The cannibal sandwich originated in Wisconsin, and it resembles an easy, homemade steak tartare. It consists of raw beef seasoned with salt and pepper and served with sliced raw onion on a slice of rye cocktail bread. Sometimes a raw egg is mixed in with the meat, which is part of what has the CDC shaking its head. Adding the raw egg basically creates a mixture which, while possibly tasty, is an ideal breeding environment for bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses.

Raw meat is really a dish one usually wants to leave to the professionals. Cannibal sandwiches have been linked to more than 50 cases of foodborne illness, the CDC said in a report this week, according to Reuters. They were linked to at least four and possibly more than a dozen cases of food-borne illness caused by E. Coli during the holiday season last year, and the CDC is hoping to avoid more instances by discouraging people from their homemade raw beef snacks. So far the campaign has not been entirely successful, the CDC admits.

"Despite ongoing outreach efforts addressing the dangers associated with consuming undercooked or raw ground beef, this regional holiday tradition continues to be associated with outbreaks," it said.


Cannibal sandwiches: Wisconsinites urged against eating traditional raw meat

Wisconsinites turning to comforting family traditions during the holiday season have been warned by their state health department to avoid one in particular: cannibal sandwiches.

The sandwiches – also known as “tiger meat” and, for the fancier-minded, “steak tartare” – consist of ground raw meat, typically beef, on a slice of bread, topped with raw onions.

In a tweet acknowledging the dish is a family tradition for some, the Wisconsin health department said: “Eating raw meat is NEVER recommended because of the bacteria it can contain. Ground beef should always be cooked to 160F!”.

For many #Wisconsin families, raw meat sandwiches are a #holiday tradition, but eating raw meat is NEVER recommended because of the bacteria it can contain. Ground beef should always be cooked to 160 degrees! Get more holiday food safety tips: https://t.co/h3fi4TfPye #foodsafety pic.twitter.com/jDqmkt6uOU

&mdash WIDeptHealthServices (@DHSWI) December 12, 2020

In a longer Facebook post, the department wrote that eating raw meat risks illnesses from bacteria that thrive in raw meat, including salmonella, E Coli and Listeria.

“And, no, it doesn’t matter where you buy your beef!” it added.

In 2018, a blogpost from the US Department of Agriculture noted that “hundreds of people in the midwest are sickened after eating cannibal sandwiches” and noted eight outbreaks in the state in connection to raw beef consumption since 1986.

The post recommended a “safe alternative”: cook the beef with the same spices and toppings, instead of serving it raw.

The tradition likely comes from migrants from northern Europe who brought traditional dishes with them.

It is not clear exactly how popular the dish is, but Bunzel’s Meat Market in Milwaukee told Wisconsin Public Radio in 2019 it goes through more than 1,000lb of raw beef and 250lb of raw onions just for the sandwiches during the holiday period.

Jeff Zupan, owner of Bunzel’s Meat Market, told WPR it appears the sandwich is making a comeback.

“People are now like, ‘Oh gee, I remember when Grandma made this,” he said.


Don't Eat This Raw Sandwich, Department of Health Warns

Holiday feasts are fertile ground for foodborne illnesses. Whether it's the fact that we prepare more food in our home kitchens or simply have more leftovers to handle, food poisoning cases usually rise in November and December. One particular holiday tradition in the Midwest has prompted the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to make a public plea about food safety.

Thousands of Wisconsinites consider raw-meat sandwiches, also known as cannibal sandwiches, a holiday tradition in their households. But consuming raw meat is never without risk, and experts are sounding the alarm about eating a food that could cause serious digestive issues. (Related: The One Vitamin Doctors Are Urging Everyone to Take Right Now .)

"Many Wisconsin families consider them to be a holiday tradition, but eating them poses a threat for Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter and Listeria bacteria that can make you sick," the Health Department wrote in a Facebook post. "Remember, ground beef should ALWAYS be cooked to an internal temperature of 160° F."

The sandwiches are often served with raw onions, which is reminiscent of steak tartare, the high-end raw meat dish that hails from France. Culinary history aside, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has offered a safer alternative for preparing cannibal sandwiches or similar raw-meat dishes, which includes cooking the protein.

"If cannibal sandwiches are a tradition in your home, try this safe alternative: Cook the ground beef with the same spices and toppings until it reaches 160°F, and serve it on top of bread or crackers," the agency said in a blog post. "You may be surprised to find that it tastes better when cooked! Not to mention, you won't be risking a trip to the hospital with every mouthful."

So basically, just lay off the raw beef!

Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest food safety news delivered straight to your inbox.


Sign up for daily news!

Stay informed with WPR's email newsletter.

"The best cannibal sandwich with the lowest risk is if you take steak, or something like steak, and you grind it up," he said. "The worst cannibal sandwich is if you simply eat ground beef out of a package because then the risk of E. coli is greater."

Paster said aim for the leanest cut of beef you can get, let your butcher know you’re using the meat for cannibal sandwiches and ask for it to be freshly ground with a clean grinder.

And don’t dawdle. Eat the meat the same day you buy it, and preferably before the end of the party.

So, where did cannibal sandwiches come from? The snack's history in Wisconsin is a little murky, but Carlisle said its story is likely one of practicality and tradition, going back to the northern Europeans who settled in the state.

"Being an extremely agricultural state, it is one of the necessities that you always had," he said. " It's kind of like making cheese in Wisconsin, like you always had dairy and you always had meat. "

Despite its history, cannibal sandwiches' popularity has plummeted. The dynamic of life changed, Carlisle said. Fewer people lived on farms, health concerns were raised and processed, convenience foods took over.

Carlisle tied cannibal sandwich popularity to other traditional Wisconsin fare which has seen similar fates — pickled herring and liver sausage, which often sat side by side on the snack table at family gatherings.

"A lot of the ways people prepared things and did things were lost for so many years, and everybody wants to blame it on the millennials, but it was long before that where it died off," Zupan said.


Jeff Zupan (left) and Chef Justin Carlisle. Mary Kate McCoy/WPR

Though Carlisle and Zupan say tastes are changing – and they're seeing signs of a cannibal sandwich comeback.

"People now are like, 'Oh gee, I remember when Grandma made this, and how'd you do it?'" Zupan said. "The inspiration for cooking again is coming back, I think people are starting to decide that they want something better."

"I’m very proud of our area," Carlisle said. "All these items that we grew up with as staples . have borderline disappeared. And now to have this come back, or at least to the people that are reinforcing and holding onto it, to me it means a lot."

While Carlisle would love to see cannibal sandwiches become a staple again, there’s still a ways to go before that could happen, he said.

But one thing is for certain, they agreed. Here in Wisconsin, the food culture is much more than burgers and fries.


CDC Warns: Don’t Eat “Tiger Meat” or “Cannibal Sandwiches” in Wisconsin

Probably, a good rule in all states.

Like some look forward to their favorite magazine, I look forward to receiving my copy – now online – of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). This week came with the reminder that people in Wisconsin need to pay a bit more attention to food safety.

On January 8, 2013, the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene notified the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) of two patients with Escherichia coli O157:H7 clinical isolates that had indistinguishable, but commonly identified, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns.

The two patients were interviewed by local health departments within 1 day of the initial report. They revealed that they had eaten raw ground beef purchased from the same meat market and served as “tiger meat” or “cannibal sandwiches.” In this dish, the raw ground beef typically is served on rye bread or crackers with onions and is a traditional winter holiday specialty in certain regions of the upper Midwest. Five agencies (the Watertown Department of Health WDPH Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and CDC) investigated to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, prevent additional infections, and better understand raw ground beef consumption.

Wisconsin folks, don’t do it.

Bill Marler is an accomplished personal injury lawyer and national expert on foodborne illness litigation. He began representing victims of foodborne illness in 1993, when he represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the Jack in the Box E. coli O157:H7&hellip

Bill Marler is an accomplished personal injury lawyer and national expert on foodborne illness litigation. He began representing victims of foodborne illness in 1993, when he represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the Jack in the Box E. coli O157:H7 outbreak, resulting in her landmark $15.6 million settlement. Marler founded Food Safety News in 2009.

Related Posts

Subscribe to Marler Blog

About Bill Marler

Bill Marler is an accomplished personal injury and products liability attorney. He began litigating foodborne illness cases in 1993, when he represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the Jack in the Box E. coli O157:H7 outbreak.


Health Department Warns Against ‘Cannibal’ Sandwich Tradition in Wisconsin

There are some strange culinary traditions here in America, thanks to our nation’s long history of rags-to-riches stories.

America is the melting pot, after all, and the people who came to her shores decades ago did so poor and hungry. And, when you’re poor enough and hungry enough, your ingenuity increases tenfold. You learn new ways to stretch a meal or a dollar, and sometimes both in a day. We invented new quasi-delicacies as we forged our way though this nation of toil and trouble.

Some of these foods have now become staples of our diet, like hot dogs and hamburgers.

Others, however, have been banished to the far flung regions of Wisconsin to be hidden away from the civilized world. These are the traditional foods that have the Cheese State’s health department concerned.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services is urging residents to put down their cannibal sandwiches, also known as raw meat sandwiches, tiger meat or steak tartare.

“Many Wisconsin families consider them to be a holiday tradition, but eating them poses a threat for Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter and Listeria bacteria that can make you sick,” the department wrote in a Facebook post Saturday, which it called its annual reminder. “Remember, ground beef should ALWAYS be cooked to an internal temperature of 160° F.”

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, part of the USA TODAY Network, included the sandwiches often served with raw onions on its 2018 list of Wisconsin’s favorite holiday culinary traditions.

The warning came complete with a recipe for a much more traditional preparation.

“If cannibal sandwiches are a tradition in your home, try this safe alternative: cook the ground beef with the same spices and toppings, until it reaches 160°F, and serve it on top of bread or crackers,” the USDA said. “You may be surprised to find that it tastes better when cooked! Not to mention, you won’t be risking a trip to the hospital with every mouthful.”

There have been several bacterial outbreaks stemming from the tradition in recent decades, and the tradition is believed to be practiced by perhaps hundreds of families in Wisconsin.


Food safety for the holidays

Wisconsin and federal health officials also offer additional food safety tips:

Eggnog: Traditional eggnog made with raw eggs is a potential risk because the raw egg may contain salmonella. While cooking can destroy the disease-causing bacteria, consumers can still become ill when the eggnog is left at room temperature for several hours before being consumed, the Wisconsin health department says. Safe alternatives are pasteurized eggnog beverages sold in grocery dairy cases, which should be kept refrigerated.

Cookie dough: Don't eat raw cookie dough and batter made with flour or eggs that can contain harmful germs, such as E. coli and salmonella. Some companies have edible cookie dough that uses heat-treated flour and pasteurized eggs or no eggs.

Raw chicken: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says don't wash raw chicken because it can spread germs from the chicken to other food or utensils in the kitchen.

Cook food thoroughly: Meat, chicken, turkey, seafood, and eggs can carry germs that cause food poisoning, the CDC says. Use a food thermometer to ensure these foods have been cooked to a safe internal temperature. Roasts, chops, steaks, and fresh ham should rest for three minutes after you remove them from the oven or grill.


Don't Eat This Raw Sandwich, Department of Health Warns

Holiday feasts are fertile ground for foodborne illnesses. Whether it's the fact that we prepare more food in our home kitchens or simply have more leftovers to handle, food poisoning cases usually rise in November and December. One particular holiday tradition in the Midwest has prompted the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to make a public plea about food safety.

Thousands of Wisconsinites consider raw-meat sandwiches, also known as cannibal sandwiches, a holiday tradition in their households. But consuming raw meat is never without risk, and experts are sounding the alarm about eating a food that could cause serious digestive issues. (Related: The One Vitamin Doctors Are Urging Everyone to Take Right Now .)

"Many Wisconsin families consider them to be a holiday tradition, but eating them poses a threat for Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter and Listeria bacteria that can make you sick," the Health Department wrote in a Facebook post. "Remember, ground beef should ALWAYS be cooked to an internal temperature of 160° F."

The sandwiches are often served with raw onions, which is reminiscent of steak tartare, the high-end raw meat dish that hails from France. Culinary history aside, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has offered a safer alternative for preparing cannibal sandwiches or similar raw-meat dishes, which includes cooking the protein.

"If cannibal sandwiches are a tradition in your home, try this safe alternative: Cook the ground beef with the same spices and toppings until it reaches 160°F, and serve it on top of bread or crackers," the agency said in a blog post. "You may be surprised to find that it tastes better when cooked! Not to mention, you won't be risking a trip to the hospital with every mouthful."

So basically, just lay off the raw beef!

Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest food safety news delivered straight to your inbox.

Italian cable car plunges to the ground, killing at least 9

Statement by Minister Joly marking Tourism Week in Canada and commending the resilience of businesses in the tourism sector

How gardeners with invasive goutweed are supporting each other

Israel reopens borders to small groups of foreign tourists

Oatly's blockbuster IPO shows healthy appetite for plant-based living is growing

'Incredible, noticeable difference': This gaming monitor from Best Buys has amazing reviews

"My friend is very jealous. No one can complain about the video quality of this monitor."

Readers reply: what do the terms ‘working class’ and ‘middle class’ actually mean?

Readers reply: what do the terms ‘working class’ and ‘middle class’ actually mean?The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts ‘I look down on him’ . John Cleese, Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett in the Class sketch on The Frost Report in 1966. Photograph: ITV/Rex/Shutterstock

Why don't you like this ad?

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

Subtle Signs You May Get Diabetes, Warn Doctors

Diabetes is at record levels in the United States. Almost 34 million Americans—just over 10.5% of the population—are affected by the body's inability to adequately process blood sugar. The condition's ubiquity may make it seem like no big deal, but nothing could be further from the truth: Untreated diabetes can damage blood vessels throughout the body, leading to heart disease, stroke, blindness, even amputation.Type 1 diabetes tends to develop in childhood, and it's unclear whether it can be prevented. But the American epidemic of diabetes is driven by Type 2, which generally develops in adulthood because of avoidable unhealthy habits, like a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle. We asked two experts from Harvard Medical School (and contributors to the new documentary Better) how to recognize the subtle signs you might have diabetes. Read on to find out more, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You Had COVID and Didn't Know It. 1 You're Getting Older People should first be screened for diabetes at age of 45, then every three years after that, says JoAnn Manson, MD, DrPH, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham&Women's Hospital. According to the CDC, being over 45 is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. 2 You Have Obesity or Are Gaining Weight If you have obesity, screening should begin earlier than age 45, says Manson. The CDC says overweight or obesity are both risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. 3 You Have Unexplained Weight Loss While overweight is a risk factor for diabetes, losing weight over a period of time without trying can be a subtle sign of the condition. "With diabetes, people can lose weight initially, without knowing that they're in the midst of their blood glucose being out of control," says John Ratey, MD, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. A friend of Ratey's lost 20 pounds over six months before being diagnosed—his blood glucose level was three times the normal level when he was hospitalized, before it was brought back under control with medication, diet, and exercise. 4 You're Urinating Frequently or Are More Thirsty "What people will often start to notice is that they're urinating more often or they're thirsty more than usual," says Manson. That's because excess blood sugar (glucose) is delivered to the kidneys, which work overtime to flush it out, causing frequent urination. Meanwhile, the excess blood sugar pulls electrolytes and fluids from tissue and organs, causing dehydration and thirst. 5 You Have Blurred Vision "Sometimes someone with diabetes will start to develop a little blurred vision," says Manson. "In fact, it's not unusual for the eye doctor to pick up signs of diabetes, especially in someone who is not having regular screenings for their blood sugar." 6 You Feel Tingling Here "Sometimes people will have what we call parasthesias or neuropathy—tingling or change in sensation in the nerve endings, especially in the hands and feet," says Manson. "That can also be a sign of blood sugar being elevated." 7 You Have Fatigue You Can't Shake Persistent fatigue is also a common sign of diabetes, says Ratey. If you're getting enough sleep and your lifestyle hasn't changed, but find you don't have the energy to go through your day as usual, it's a good idea to talk with your healthcare provider. And to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these 16 "Health" Tips to Stop Following Immediately.

Stress About Money Is Doing a Number on Your Heart Health

It's even worse if you're Black. Discover why it's that way, and how to ease the strain on your body.

19 Ways You're Ruining Your Body, Say Health Experts

A head cold, again? Some years, it seems like you're constantly coming down with something. But a worse-than-usual flu season may not be entirely to blame. There are a bunch of ways you might be weakening your immune system without even knowing it, all day long—from how much sleep you get to your sugar intake to the items you touch at the office. Eat This, Not That! Health has rounded them up here. Gesundheit. Read on—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these 16 "Health" Tips to Stop Following Immediately. 1 You're Lonely Loneliness can cause chronic stress, wearing down your immune system. According to a study published in the journal Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, feelings of loneliness affect the body on a genetic level—it causes an increase in pro-inflammatory genes and decrease in genes that produce antibodies and immunity. "The resulting long-term inflammation may represent a key mechanism in the development of loneliness-associated chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neurodegeneration," the scientists said. Yikes.The Rx: Never get too lonely. Maintain social connections and make an effort to be around others regularly. Or just give someone a (consensual) hug. According to a study published in Psychological Science, the simple act of hugging someone reduces stress and gives you an immune boost. 2 You're Deficient In Vitamin D An adequate vitamin D level is protective against several types of cancer. And D seems to help guard against colds and flu as well. According to a study published in the Journal of Investigative Medicine, a low vitamin D level is associated with "an increased susceptibility to infection" and increased autoimmunity, in which the immune system becomes confused and begins attacking the body instead of protecting it. Fifty percent of people worldwide are deficient in vitamin D, the National Institutes of Health says. The Rx: According to the NIH's Office of Dietary Supplements, adults should get 600 IU of vitamin D daily, and 800 after age 70. (It also protects bone health.) Your doctor can test for vitamin D deficiency with a simple blood test, and advise you on a vitamin D supplement if it's a good idea. 3 You're Not Washing Your Hands If there's one tip everyone knows about preventing illness, it's this one: Wash your hands. But too many of us aren't doing it. A study by the American Society of Microbiology found that 83 percent of women washed their hands after using a public restroom—but only 74 percent of men did. And a separate study from Michigan State University found that 95 percent of us don't wash our hands well enough to kill bacteria. To learn the correct technique, read on. The Rx: Wash your hands after using the restroom, before preparing food, or any time you feel they might be dirty. 4 You're Not Washing Your Hands Long Enough That MSU study found that only 5 percent of us wash our hands correctly, only one in three people use soap, and 1 in 10 don't bother with the basin at all. Not washing your hands exposes you to all kinds of disease-causing bacteria and viruses, from the common cold to norovirus to strep and staph.The Rx: Here's advice from the people who should know: the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends washing your hands vigorously using soap and water for 15 to 20 seconds—about the time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday" twice. But the MSU researchers found that bathroom users only washed their hands for an average of 6 seconds, and just 5 percent of people washed their hands for 15 seconds or more. 5 You're Not Getting Enough Sleep When we sleep, the body engages in several processes to repair and recharge the body. One of them is to make sure the immune system stays up to snuff. During sleep, the body produces inflammatory proteins called cytokines, along with restocking various disease-fighting cells and antibodies. If you're not getting enough shut-eye, that could be why you keep coming down with colds and flu.The Rx: Experts including the National Sleep Foundation recommend that adults get seven to nine hours of quality sleep nightly. If you're having trouble falling or staying asleep, talk with your doctor—your overall health is at risk. 6 You're Constantly Stressed Chronic stress weakens the body and the immune system. When you're stressed, the brain increases its production of the stress hormone cortisol, which impairs T cells, a component in the blood that fights infection. According to the American Cancer Society, people who experience chronic stress are more prone to the common cold and viral infections like the flu. The Rx: In today's world, reducing stress is easier said than done. But it's essential to mental and physical health. Regular exercise is an excellent stress reliever. Learning relaxation exercises can help. If you find yourself constantly stressed, talk to your health care provider.RELATED: The #1 Cause of Heart Attack, According to Science 7 You're Not Using Hand Sanitizer At The Grocery Store A recent study found that more than half the shopping carts at an average grocery store carry disease-causing bacteria, such as E. coli, which can cause diarrhea, nausea and fever. A separate study found that handles in the freezer section of a superstore held 33,340 bacteria colonies per square inch—more than a thousand times the bacteria found on the average cell phone. The Rx: Some grocery stores have antibacterial wipes you can use to wipe down the handle of your shopping cart. You can also buy a pack to bring with you. Wipe the handle, then let it dry completely for 20 seconds before you touch it. 8 You Don't Get Your Flu Shot This is an easy one. The CDC recommends that all adults get a flu shot every year. It can reduce your chances of contracting influenza, which can cause serious or fatal complications like pneumonia—and cause a "twindemic" along with coronavirus.The Rx: Get your flu shot. Ask your health care provider if you should get any other vaccinations, such as against shingles, while you're at it. 9 You Don't Get Enough Exercise According to a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, being sedentary can impair the body's ability to fight infection. The Rx: If you work a desk job, get up and move around as much possible. Take a break from sitting every 30 minutes. And get regular exercise: The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous physical activity every week. 10 You're Exercising Too Much It's called overtraining syndrome: Constantly working out, without giving your body a chance to rest, is not only counterproductive to your fitness goals it can impair your immune system. 11 You're Drinking Too Much A hangover isn't the only way over-imbibing can make you sick. Alcohol breaks down into acetaldehyde, a potent toxin. In excess, acetaldehyde impedes the lungs' ability to sweep microbes out of the body (hello, common cold) and reduces the ability of white blood cells to kill bacteria and viruses. Just one night of heavy drinking is enough to significantly impair the immune system, researchers have found.The Rx: How much alcohol is too much? Experts, including the CDC and American Cancer Society, say men should have no more than two drinks daily, and women one. 12 You Commute On Public Transportation Straphanging might be hazardous to your health. A British study found that people who take the bus or subway to work are six times more likely to get an acute respiratory infection than people who walk or drive. That's simply because you encounter many more people—and their germs.The Rx: After you get off public transportation, use hand sanitizer or wash your hands (with soap, and at least for 20 seconds). 13 You're Consuming Too Much Sugar Sugar causes inflammation, which decreases immunity by weakening white blood cells, whose job is to fight off infection. And most of us eat too much of it. The American Heart Association recommends that men eat no more than 9 teaspoons (36 grams) of added sugar per day and that women have no more than 6 teaspoons (24 grams). The average American eats about 15 teaspoons every day.The Rx: Reduce your consumption of added sugars like sugar-sweetened drinks, processed cereals, cookies and cake. Eat a variety of whole foods, fruits and vegetables—you'll get vitamins and nutrients that will keep you healthy. RELATED: The #1 Cause of Diabetes, According to Science 14 You're Overweight Obesity weighs heavily on the immune system. Being overweight prevents white blood cells from producing antibodies and agents that fight inflammation. In an animal study conducted at the University of North Carolina, researchers found that obese mice were 10 times more likely to die when infected with a flu virus than mice of normal weight. The Rx: Maintain a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and staying active.RELATED: The #1 Cause of Obesity, According to Science 15 You're Taking Antibiotics Too Much Antibiotics are meant to treat infections caused by bacteria. They don't work on viruses like the common cold or flu. If you unnecessarily take antibiotics for those viral infections too often, you could become resistant to them.The Rx: If your doctor diagnoses you with a virus, don't insist on being prescribed an antibiotic "just to be safe." It's anything but. 16 You Don't Drink Enough Water As we age, it's easier to become dehydrated, and that can strain your immune system. Dehydration limits the secretion of antimicrobial proteins into your saliva, which ward off infections. That's not the only way dehydration can make you sick: water carries nutrients and oxygen to your cells, flushes bacteria from your bladder and normalizes blood pressure, among several other functions. The Rx: Harvard Medical School recommends drinking four to six cups of water a day.RELATED: Signs You're Getting One of the "Most Deadly" Cancers. 17 You're Not Cleaning Your Cell Phone Here's a fun fact: Your cellphone may contain 10 times more bacteria than a toilet seat. Charles Gerba, a microbiologist at the University of Arizona, has tested phones that contained 100,000 bacteria. "Viruses are a bit more mobile today than ever before, because you've got mobile phones," said Gerba.The Rx: Disinfect your cellphone once a month with a solution of 60% water and 40% rubbing alcohol. Apply it with a microfiber cloth or cotton pad. Don't spray anything directly onto the phone you might damage it.RELATED: 9 Everyday Habits That Might Lead to Dementia, Say Experts 18 You're Not Using Hand Sanitizer At Work Offices are hotbeds of germs—keyboards, phones, desks. But the germiest surfaces are likely in the break room, particularly the coffee pot. When Gerba's researchers tested germ levels in a typical office, they placed a synthetic germ in the break room. It spread to nearly every surface in the office within four hours. The Rx: Keep hand sanitizer at your desk, and use it after each trip to the coffee pot. Make it a habit to wipe down your desk, phone, keyboard and door handles with an antibacterial wipe or spray.RELATED: 9 Everyday Habits That Might Lead to Dementia, Say Experts 19 You're Touching Your Face After Using Door Handles The common cold virus and flu bugs can linger on hard indoor surfaces for up to seven days. Opening a door and then touching your face is an incredibly efficient way to pick up whatever's there—often the common cold or coronavirus.The Rx: When you're out in public, make it a practice to wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before you eat, drink or touch your eyes, nose or mouth. And to get through life at your healthiest, don't miss: This Supplement Can Raise Your Cancer Risk, Experts Say.

Are We Getting Closer to COVID Herd Immunity? Experts' Timelines Are Evolving Rapidly

Slowly declining vaccine rates are crucial here.

Alexander Whitley: Overflow review – watch out for the bodyscanners!

Alexander Whitley: Overflow review – watch out for the bodyscanners!. Sadler’s Wells, LondonThere’s little optimism in Whitley’s subtle blast at digital overload but there are some excellent hypnotic effects


What’s a Cannibal Sandwich, And Why Is Wisconsin Trying to Cancel Them?

In the 󈨊s and 󈨔s, University of Colorado students would gorge themselves on a banquet of raw meat, red onions and jalapeno peppers as part of an annual Packer Day feast that was held in honor of Alfred G. Packer, a convicted cannibal who ate five of his companions after a snowstorm trapped them in the San Juan mountains in the winter of 1873.

Though Packer Day has since been deemed to have been in bad taste, there’s another state in the U.S. where eating raw meat remains an annual winter custom — or does it?

In Wisconsin, it is a holiday tradition to eat a slice of bread topped with a spread of fresh raw ground beef, chopped onions and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Known as a cannibal sandwich, the unusual dish makes hundreds of people sick each year, according to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

I am aware steak tartare is a thing, but this "cannibal sandwich" thing is way beyond that. pic.twitter.com/FFdhObiFeb

&mdash Bloob (@Hooberbloob) December 14, 2020

That being the case, the Wisconsin DHS is urging state residents to forego eating the sandwich — which is sometimes referred to as tiger meat or a wildcat — this year, especially with so many other health concerns to worry about.

For many #Wisconsin families, raw meat sandwiches are a #holiday tradition, but eating raw meat is NEVER recommended because of the bacteria it can contain. Ground beef should always be cooked to 160 degrees! Get more holiday food safety tips: https://t.co/h3fi4TfPye #foodsafety pic.twitter.com/jDqmkt6uOU

&mdash WIDeptHealthServices (@DHSWI) December 12, 2020

Since 1986, there have been eight outbreaks in the state linked to the consumption of raw ground beef, according to the Wisconsin DHS. It is quite possible the number of outbreaks will increase to nine if the advisement from the Wisconsin DHS is ignored.

“Not good. It is kind of crazy to be doing that in this climate. I wouldn’t eat it,” NYC chef John DeLucie tells InsideHook. “Even I eat my burgers medium now. It’s not my favorite, but it is smart.”

According to James Peisker of Nashville-based butcher shop Porter Road, the only way to safely try a cannibal sandwich is to immediately consume one using meat that was trimmed and ground in your presence.

Wisconsin Department of Health warns against eating the 'cannibal sandwich,' a traditional holiday dish in the state with raw hamburger and onions on bread. pic.twitter.com/HRvV7DtdkE

&mdash Eric Widi (@eric_widi) December 15, 2020

“There is a safe way to enjoy this tradition but it must be done with the utmost care of cleanliness,” Peisker says. “E. coli lives on the outside of the meat until it is cut or ground to the inside of the product. That is why it is safer to eat a steak rare than a burger. In a burger, the outside surface of the meat is all mixed together in the grinding process. If you want to try this, it would be best to try it at home with a very clean and sanitized grinder. If you really want to be safe, trim the outside of your meat and save it for another project and only use the inside that didn’t touch any of the cutting board that touched the outside of the cut before grinding. Or, get the meat from your trusted local butcher and enjoy.

While we can’t recommend it, if you do give it a shot, plan accordingly.


Wisconsin health officials warn against eating raw meat ⟊nnibal sandwiches'

For many #Wisconsin families, raw meat sandwiches are a #holiday tradition, but eating raw meat is NEVER recommended because of the bacteria it can contain. Ground beef should always be cooked to 160 degrees! Get more holiday food safety tips: https://t.co/h3fi4TfPye #foodsafety pic.twitter.com/jDqmkt6uOU

— WIDeptHealthServices (@DHSWI) December 12, 2020

"For many #Wisconsin families, raw meat sandwiches are a #holiday tradition, but eating raw meat is NEVER recommended because of the bacteria it can contain," a warning from Wisconsin Department of Health Services posted on Dec. 12 reads. "Ground beef should always be cooked to 160 degrees!"

Raw meat sandwiches are apparently a longtime southeastern Wisconsin Christmas tradition, according to a 2019 article from Wisconsin Public Radio. The star ingredient is, of course, raw ground beef, usually seasoned with spices and onions and served on bread or a cracker.

It’s sometimes also called “tiger meat” or “steak tartare.” According to the Wisconsin Historical Society, it’s most often served as an appetizer on rye cocktail bread at “festive gatherings” in the Milwaukee area. The exact history of the dish is a bit murky, though the general consensus is the appetizer was brought across the pond by northern Europeans who settled in the state.

Justin Carlisle, the chef of Ardent Restaurant in Milwaukee, explained the dish stemmed out of necessity.

Growing up on a farm in Sparta, Wisconsin, about 30 miles east of La Crosse, Carlisle's family slaughtered some of the animals they raised during the holiday season.

"It’s a historical dish and it’s mostly a dish and let's be quite frank . it’s trying to make something nice out of a world where we didn’t group up with a whole lot," he explained, adding normally they would sell the animals they raised. "To be able to keep these parts for ourselves, we wanted to share them for the holidays."

To this day, Carlisle's restaurant serves a version of the dish, though he said it's somewhat elevated from the traditional cannibal sandwich.

"We’ve had a lot of people come to our restaurant and not shied away from you know, raw beef," he said, adding that "fewer than five people" have turned down that course over the past several years. "It's never going anywhere."

He explained that to him, the cannibal sandwich represents something much more than an upper Midwest oddity. It's a "thoughtful" dish that represents sharing in the community.

"Don’t judge. You know, it is somebody’s heritage, it is somebody’s upbringing," he said. "If you don’t agree with it, be open about it, and accept that you don’t have to agree or eat it. But it is a culture, it’s part of people's culture."

According to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, a total of eight bacterial outbreaks have been reported in the state since 1986 as a result of eating raw ground beef, including a large salmonella outbreak involving more than 150 people during December 1994.

In a 2018 statement, the U.S. Department of Agriculture encouraged people to cook meat fully all the time and when it comes to cannibal sandwiches, to try a “safe alternative” of just cooking the ground beef with the same toppings.

Samantha Kubota is a digital journalist and editor for TODAY Digital based in Los Angeles.


Watch the video: Kannibale von Berlin: Bizarrer Fund im Keller des mutmaßlichen Täters! (October 2021).