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The Best Dishes We Ate in 2011 Slideshow

The Best Dishes We Ate in 2011 Slideshow

Arthur Bovino

I'd have to say the best dish I ate this year is a toss-up between two sandwiches and a hot dog. The first is a signature dish of the famed Le Comptoir in Paris, their croque monsieur. Available with either the classic French ham or smoked salmon and caviar, this sandwich oozes with expertly melted cheese and the ideal ratio of fillings to buttery bread. The second is a Shake Shack hot dog (arguably one of the best in New York City), topped with cheese sauce and sport peppers (pictured) — an "off the menu" item. Last, but not least, is the lobster roll from Pearl Oyster Bar in New York City — a true model of sandwich perfection.

Next year I'm looking forward to indulging in a meal at Del Posto, mainly to sink my fork into chef Mark Ladner's 100-layer lasagna.

Molly Aronica, Restaurant Editor

Arthur Bovino

I'd have to say the best dish I ate this year is a toss-up between two sandwiches and a hot dog. Last, but not least, is the lobster roll from Pearl Oyster Bar in New York City — a true model of sandwich perfection.

Next year I'm looking forward to indulging in a meal at Del Posto, mainly to sink my fork into chef Mark Ladner's 100-layer lasagna.

Allison Beck, Entertain Editor

My favorite meal from 2011? Farmer's Feast at Blue Hill Stone Barns at the peak of the September harvest. I love the tomato burgers, and they brought out this gluten-free bread that had us all swooning. My favorite dish was the fresh farm egg, which was perfectly tender, cooked white with a golden molten yolky center. I believe it was served with mushrooms (pictured). Oh, it was amazing.

Next year I'm looking forward to going back to Il Cantinori for their veal milanese — so good. They've been shut because of a fire for about two months now, though.

Francesca Borgognone, Assistant to Colman Andrews

The best thing I ate last year would have to be this amazing risotto I had at The Lion in New York City. It was with zucchini flowers, squash, ricotta salata, and had an egg yolk nestled right in the center. It was so simple, though divinely intense in flavor, especially with the ricotta salata. A close second is the wild rice, pepper, and herb-stuffed whole branzino at Le Souk that was also fairly basic, but so bold in taste with all of those Moroccan spices.

And as for this year, I have been wanting to try Buvette’s croque madame (pictured) like it’s no one’s business. Something about the idea of prosciutto instead of ham in this sandwich kills me.

Jessica Chou, Associate Editor

Yelp/Jenny B

The best thing I ate this year was the toro sushi (pictured) at Sushi Gen in Los Angeles. (It’s a dish, not a meal, but I sat at the sushi bar so the meal consisted of a ton of mini orders.)

The dish I'm most looking forward to eating next year is a chicken biscuit from Pies 'n' Thighs in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Nicole Campoy-Leffler, Travel Editor

As far as 2011 goes, the best thing I ate comes from a weekend in Las Vegas in October, when I was invited to dinner at BARMASA where, blessedly, the menu was pre-set by Masa himself. His uni risotto with white truffle (pictured) and toro tartare with caviar are fighting for top spot of the best meal I’ve eaten all year, so I’ll let them share the honor.

I’ll be in Peru for New Year’s Eve this year and in my neurotic and excited research, I’ve read story upon salivating story about the amazing food. Of course, I can’t wait for fresh ceviche at holes in the wall and bright pisco sours, but I’m really looking forward to traditional causas (Peruvian potatoes with chile, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt and served with shrimp, quail eggs, and tomatoes), cuy (guinea pig), and deep fried “truffles” filled with bittersweet dark chocolate at Astrid y Gastón.

Maryse Chevriere, Drink Editor

Arthur Bovino

The best dish I ate this year was the oyster pan roast at The John Dory Oyster Bar in New York City (pictured). Although not new to the scene, it was new to me this year — a dish that had been on my wish list since the restaurant reopened, and once I finally had it, a dish so good I was furious at myself for not having tasted it sooner. Rich, creamy, buttery, decadent — all those overused food descriptors, the pan roast has them in spades. And you just know, those fat, plumped-up oysters sitting at the bottom of the bowl, soaking it all up, have never had a better gig.

As far as the dish I'm most looking forward to in 2012, this summer I have a trip planned to one of my favorite food cities: Florence. In lieu of taking the easy (albeit honest) road and simply saying “I’m looking forward to eating everything,” I’ll single out the Bollito sandwich at Nerbone in the Mercato Centrale — a no-frills boiled beef sandwich dressed simply with jus and all the spicy pepper trimmings in good crusty bread.

Valaer Murray, Managing Editor

For my favorite dish of the year, I would have said the revelatory pepperoni pizza I had when I finally made my way to Di Fara before those recent health code violations, or maybe the marrow bone with chimichurri at Animal, or the Spam fries at Maharlika. But, perhaps, the most intense taste memory of the year was the bak kut teh I had at Ya Hua on my last night in Singapore. I’d already eaten four meals that day, but the peppery bowl of spareribs and broth checked all my boxes: surprising, comforting, accessible, unique, satisfying. I couldn’t get enough.

New Orleans is a food odyssey that I’m almost embarrassed to say that I haven’t been on yet. There are so many restaurants — August, Cochon, Mother’s — and foods — beignets, crawfish étouffée, po’ boys — to cover. The one thing that I particularly lust after is the original muffaletta from Central Grocery (pictured).

Will Budiaman, Recipe Editor

Arthur Bovino

The best dish I ate this year was the tagliatelle al ragu at Al Di La in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Ok, I’ve had it before, but the dish that I'm most looking forward to eating (again) in 2012 is the Black Label burger at Minetta Tavern (pictured).

Colman Andrews, Editorial Director

I ate a lot of wonderful food in 2011, but I just had a dinner so remarkable that I'm tempted to call it my best meal of the year. The occasion was the Alex's Lemonade Stand benefit, in an event space above Barbuto in Manhattan. An astonishing array of chefs — Bloomfield, Colicchio, Vetri, Bradley, Samuelsson, Phan, Waxman of course, and many more, each cooked for a table of ten. "My" chef was Nancy Silverton of Mozza in L.A., who fed us exquisite burrata made moments before (it needed nothing more than alittle sea salt); denseorecchiette cloaked in an intense sausage-chard sauce, denser than the one at left, with seasoned breadcrumbs (the poor man's parmigiano in southern Italy); and slices of gorgeous rare beef rib chops with a charred salty crust so good I wanted to lick it off, along with a jungle of crisp, bitterish greens. I could have eaten three helpings of each, and probably did.

In the year to come, I hope to be able to sample some of Moreno Cedroni's "susci" outside Ancona, on Italy's eastern coast, and some good roasted goat in Monterrey.


16 Chicken Dishes to Convince You to Get Some Crispy Skin in the Game

Want to start making the best chicken dinners of your life? Quit buying skinless. Now, we're not hating on any particular chicken dishes—we really love them all. But we want these 16 crispy-on-the-outside, juicy-on-the-inside recipes to show you that crunchy, crackly, skin-on chicken is really the best there is.


2011's Over-the-Top Fast Foods


For years, America's fast-food empires have embodied what's wrong with our eating habits: Too fast, for one thing, and too fatty. And thanks to the trend that dominated fast food in 2011, you can add another downside: Way, way too flagrantly over-the-top.

This was the year that fast-food outlets across America took outrageous eating options to a brand-new level - one where quick lunches at times resembled unconquerable eating challenges. In 2011, greasy meat-and-cheese-laden pizza was stuffed with even more meat and cheese, layers of an overeater's favorites were combined into a giant bacon-topped bowl, and three sandwiches were crammed together and sold as one. Starbucks even got into the act, unveiling a 31-ounce "Trenta" cup.

Food historians may one day trace the fast-food fervor back to one Southern-themed chain restaurant, which in 2010 declared that some sandwiches "didn't have room for a bun." KFC's slick marketing move spawned a new kind of fast food, one that "doubled down" on a menu item's greasiest elements. And, as food purveyors soon noted, exponentially multiplied promotional buzz and online chatter.

"These crass, commercial foods are aimed specifically at the young, male, macho demographic," Marion Nestle, professor of food sciences at New York University, told The Daily Meal. "And they're further evidence that food companies have only one goal - selling food products."

And sell, they do. In 2010, reports circulated online that customers drove across state lines to score a KFC Double Down, and the chain sold 10 million of the sandwiches in their first month. So it makes sense that outrageous gimmicks were a vital strategy in 2011 for plenty of outlets, and will likely continue to reign over American diners in the New Year. From Dunkin' Donuts Sausage Pancake Bites to Pizza Hut's Big Dinner Box, check out 2011's most over-the-top fast-food dishes.

Burger King Stuffed Steakhouse Burger
Calories - 590
If fast food has taught us one thing, it is this: Any food item can be stuffed inside any other. Burger King's Stuffed Steakhouse Burger, introduced earlier this year, is a prime example. Not content to simply put cheese atop a burger patty, the chain stuffed bits of Cheddar and jalapeño inside the beef, for "an experience you can see and taste in every bite."

Pizza Hut's Big Dinner Box
Calories - 4,860 (for the lowest calorie options)
Pizza Hut's "epic-size" repast offers up two medium pizzas, eight wings, and five breadsticks - in one convenient box! For the low prize of $20, ravenous diners might be tempted to scarf down the entire thing themselves, but please, make this one a family affair: The items in a single box are estimated to contain around 5,000 calories.

Dunkin' Donuts Sausage Pancake Bites
Calories - 300 (for 3)
If you're craving a pancake and sausage breakfast, but just can't find the time, Dunkin' Donuts discovered a solution in 2011. An order of the chain's Sausage Pancake Bites offered diners three nuggets of flapjack dough that each enclosed a sausage link. A trio of nuggets also managed to enclose 20 grams of fat, more than most doughnuts.

Taco Bell Doritos Locos Tacos
Calories - 350 (for 1)
Think outside the bun - and the conventional taco shell. In an apparent bid to include as much junk as possible in a single meal, Taco Bell used California and Ohio residents as guinea pigs to test shells made entirely of Doritos' nacho-flavored chips. The cheesy delicacy might be introduced nationwide next year, when, presumably, the chain will also swaps burrito wraps for potato chips.

Friendly's Ultimate Grilled-Cheese Burger Melt
Calories - 1,500
Why eat one sandwich, when you can eat three? The KFC Double Down may have replaced a burger bun with fried chicken, but this year, Friendly's managed to outdo even that monstrosity. They swapped out a cheeseburger's bread with two entire grilled cheese sandwiches. This gastronomical innovation, not surprisingly, is also a caloric nightmare: 1,500 per sandwich(es). Even that doesn't seem to be helping the company - the 76-year-old family-dining brand filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Oct. 5, and is scheduled to be auctioned Dec. 22.


3 Popular Side Dishes of the Georgian Cuisine

1. Tkhemali

Tkhemali is a sour plum sauce that is often served with cheese, meat or even fish dishes. Every family has a jar of this sauce in their house as it’s also said to be a cleanser.

I don’t particularly like the sour taste of this sauce but ever since Niko has had a taste of it, there’s been a bottle of tkhemali in our backpack…

2. Puri (Shotis Puri)

Puri means bread in the Georgian language (remember khacha – puri). You’ll often see people walking around with several loaves of this huge flatbread that has the shape of a canoe.

The puri is baked in a specific bakery that has a “tone”, a traditional clay oven, in which the bread is baked.

The puri comes out tainted with brown edges and black bits from the oven and is both crispy and soft. Very delicious in combination with the salty Georgian cheeses!

3. Mchadi

Mchadi is another popular Georgian bread. It’s a cornbread that is traditionally eaten with lobio and cheese. Our Georgian friends in Tbilisi often made it especially for us.

I hope I could enrich your culinary knowledge about Georgian food and hope I’ve triggered your curiosity to try out all these mouth-watering dishes!

Have you ever heard of any of the foods I’ve mentioned? Which one appeals to you the most? Or do you know another yummy Georgian food that I definitely have to try? Let me know in the comments!

Special thanks to the lovely Andriadze family for inviting us weekly for dinner in Tbilisi, treating us like royalties and teaching us so much about the Georgian culture and food!


16 Chicken Dishes to Convince You to Get Some Crispy Skin in the Game

Want to start making the best chicken dinners of your life? Quit buying skinless. Now, we&aposre not hating on any particular chicken dishes—we really love them all. But we want these 16 crispy-on-the-outside, juicy-on-the-inside recipes to show you that crunchy, crackly, skin-on chicken is really the best there is.

Remember: Spatchcock is not a dirty word. In fact, it&aposs the speediest, easiest way to grill a whole bird. Also known as butterflying, the technique exposes lots of skin directly to the heat, guaranteeing thorough browning and crisping𠅌oaxed further by pressing with bricks.

Boredom? Never. Try swapping in baby turnips for the radishes and kale or Swiss chard for the mustard greens in this effortless dish.

Boredom? Never. Try swapping in baby turnips for the radishes and kale or Swiss chard for the mustard greens in this effortless dish.

Save the extra chicken-infused olive oil for all your roasted vegetable needs or to make this dish a second time.

Save the extra chicken-infused olive oil for all your roasted vegetable needs or to make this dish a second time.

Talk about a spring chicken. The sour-sweet rhubarb butter seasons and bastes the meat as the bird roasts.

Talk about a spring chicken. The sour-sweet rhubarb butter seasons and bastes the meat as the bird roasts.

A beautifully browned bird and seasonal vegetables cook in a single skillet for an effortless dinner. Swap in carrots, quartered onions, or tiny potatoes𠅊nything goes.

A beautifully browned bird and seasonal vegetables cook in a single skillet for an effortless dinner. Swap in carrots, quartered onions, or tiny potatoes𠅊nything goes.

Sophisticated enough for a Sunday supper yet quick enough for Wednesday&aposs dinner, this master recipe is all in the technique. Cook the thighs skin side down in a cast-iron skillet to render out the fat and make the skin as crisp and, dare we say, delicious as bacon.

Sophisticated enough for a Sunday supper yet quick enough for Wednesday&aposs dinner, this master recipe is all in the technique. Cook the thighs skin side down in a cast-iron skillet to render out the fat and make the skin as crisp and, dare we say, delicious as bacon.

Rubbing the marinade onto only the flesh side puts it in direct contact with the meat and lets the skin get extra crisp, with no fear of burned bits.

Rubbing the marinade onto only the flesh side puts it in direct contact with the meat and lets the skin get extra-crisp with no fear of burned bits.

Harissa is a great shortcut ingredient to flavor, but no two jars (or tubes) are the same. Taste first—if it seems very spicy, use a bit less. You can always stir more into the chickpeas when the dish is finished.

Harissa is a great shortcut ingredient to flavor, but no two jars (or tubes) are the same. Taste first—if it seems very spicy, use a bit less. You can always stir more into the chickpeas when the dish is finished. Learn how to make this recipe and more in our online cooking class with Sur la Table.

This dish of shatteringly crisp chicken skins tossed with peanuts, chiles, and lime is a riff on Chinese salt-and-pepper squid.

This dish of shatteringly crisp chicken skins tossed with peanuts, chiles, and lime is a riff on Chinese salt-and-pepper squid.

Named for a region in Normandy known for its apples (and Calvados), this traditional recipe combines both in a rich, creamy sauce. Afraid to flambé? Buy a long-reach lighter at a hardware store.

Named for a region in Normandy known for its apples (and Calvados), this traditional recipe combines both in a rich, creamy sauce. Afraid to flambé? Buy a long-reach lighter at a hardware store.

Want super-crisp chicken without having to add much fat? Start with a room temperature pan: As the skillet becomes hot, the chicken skin will gradually render the fat, becoming browned and crackling.

Brining the chicken seasons it down to the bone, and helps keep the flesh juicy while it cooks. If making chicken crackling is not your thing, simply use two bone-in breasts and two bone-in thighs.

Brining this lemon chicken seasons it down to the bone, and helps keep the flesh juicy while it cooks. If making chicken crackling is not your thing, simply use two bone-in breasts and two bone-in thighs.

Creamy without being heavy, a dollop of lemony yogurt brings the dish together.

Creamy without being heavy, a dollop of lemony yogurt brings the dish together.

Use your newly skinless thighs in a braise.

Use your newly skinless thighs in a braise.

Our favorite Dutch oven is heavy-duty, big enough for any stew, and handsome enough to put on the table.

This chicken and dumpling recipe with mushrooms will become your go-to for a warming winter supper.

This is an infinitely customizable dish: Try different fresh herbs, add thinly sliced vegetables, or throw in some spices.

This is an infinitely customizable dish: Try different fresh herbs, add thinly sliced vegetables, or throw in some spices.

Let that chicken marinade as long as you can, because when it hits the grill, you want the skin to crisp and that flavor to be locked in. This chicken really knows how to bring the heat.

Some like it hot. And those that do will absolutely love this jerk chicken recipe, which calls for heaps of Scotch bonnet (or habanero) peppers.


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South Carolina: Shrimp and Grits

South Carolinians in the Lowcountry came up with the genius idea to combine creamy grits with fresh shrimp. Consider us indebted.

And even though Charleston&rsquos Peninsula Grill wasn't the first to serve coconut cake, it certainly serves the ultimate one. How ultimate, you might wonder? Try 12 layers of moist, buttery cake held together with fluffy coconut filling.

Recipe: Southern Shrimp and Grits


52 Best Indian Food Dishes To Try: What to Eat, Where to Eat in India

Coming to India? How can you stay away from the mouth-watering variety of Indian cuisine while you are visiting Taj Mahal? Or are you confused about best Indian food dishes to try on your trip to India ? Imagine if someone can point you towards the best dishes to eat in India, here’s my honest attempt in doing so.

Also Read: The Beginner’s guide I recommend reading to all guests of my Boutique Bed & Breakfast The Hideout Agra – Essential India Travel Guide: 25 Ultimate Things To Know Before You Land in India

India continues to amaze you in all aspects ranging from culture, history, traditions or the food… Whether you are exploring the high mountains in the north or sun bathing on the down south beaches, you will find that as you travel every 100 miles the food changes along with the culture. From spicy Samosa to sweet Lassi, from finger licking Butter Chicken to orgasmic Biryani… India has something for everyone. So while you are here, explore and experience India through your taste buds without worrying about Delhi Belly or any Belly…

For those of you who are not yet aware, we do offer Agra Food Walk – Explore Agra by Mouth where you can taste the unlimited samples of many of the foods listed down for a small price. So if you happen to be in Agra with some free time in your hands (2-3 hours) & an empty stomach, get in touch with us for exploring the best of India through your taste buds. Check video & photos down below at the end to find out why people love this food tour.

Here is the ultimate India’s best food guide to 52 Best Indian Food dishes to eat on your next visit to India.

Best Indian Food Dishes to Try – Must Eat Indian Food

Starters / Snacks

1. PAAV BHAAJI


Although a spicy fast food of Maharastrian origin but you can find on every corner of India, paav bhaji consists of buttered bread (Paav) and a thick vegetable curry (Bhaji) served with chopped onion and a slice of lemon. Ideal for breakfast.

2. IDLY SAMBAR


This south Indian breakfast is the combination of steamed fermented rice cake (Idli) with a sour vegetable stew (Sambar) and often accompanied with white coconut chutney. Although find all over India, but tastes best in the southern states of India. Real inexpensive light breakfast.

3. CHOLE BHATURE


This is typical Punjabi breakfast which consists of fluffy fried bread (Bhature) and a thick curry of chickpeas (Chole) is widely available as a street food all over the country, especially the northern parts.


Popular appetizers/ snacks in India served at tea time. A fried or baked triangular snack made of a potato stuffing containing onions and peas, served with mint or tomato chutney.

5. Panipuri / Puchka / Gol Gappe


Small crisp hollow round bread filled with spiced water, tamarind paste, potato, onion, and chickpeas. It is small enough to fit completely in mouth and available throughout India with different names such as Puchka in West Bengal. The most popular modification is to put little whiskey or rum into it instead of spiced water & than the taste becomes out of the world.


Puffed rice fried with vegetables, in a spicy and tangy tamarind sauce along with chopped onion and green chilies. It’s the famous tea time snack found throughout India.


This is the Indian version of Doughnut which is a South Indian snack staple made of a lentil or flour batter fried into a doughnut shape. Usually eaten with chutney & famous in Mumbai.


A snack/breakfast food from Gujrat, made of fermented rice and chickpea batter. Although find it most parts of India, but best to have in Gujrat.


Many different varieties are available in Kebabs which are basically grilled threaded meat on a skewer. Any kind of meat may be used along with cubes of vegetables or cheese. Typical vegetables include tomato, bell peppers, onions and mushrooms.

10. Kati Roll


A traditional wrap of kebabs, eggs, vegetables, and spices rolled into Paratha (a type of flat bread). Usually one is enough to skip the meal.

11. Papri Chaat


Crispy, fried dough wafers served with boiled potatoes, boiled chick peas, chilies, yogurt, tamarind chutney, and several spices.

12. Pyaaj Ki Kachori


Popular breakfast or evening snack found in North India, it is deep-fried and filled with onions, potato to be eaten with mint chutney.

13. Mawa Kachori


Deep fried dry fruit stuffed kachoris served sprinkled with icing sugar. These are special delicacy of Rajasthan & only found there. Make sure not to miss them on your trip to Jaipur/Jodhpur/Udaipur.

14. Mirchi Vada


Popular spicy street snack of Rajasthan consisting of a big green chilli stuffed with masala potato filling and deep-fried. Jodhpur is the best place to have Mirchi Vada.

15. Kachori / Bedai


Famous morning breakfast of North Indians especially in Delhi and Agra region. Kachori is always filled with some kind of stuffing, usually potato while Bedai is empty from inside. To be eaten with potato vegetable curry.

16. Dahi Vada


Dahi Vadas are lentil dumplings dipped in yogurt and topped with spicy savory tamarind chutney. These are great as a side dish for a formal dinner, appetizer or served as a chaat.


Although an accessory to enhance the taste, Indian pickles consist of a large variety of pickled fruits and vegetables which are acidified with lime or lemon juice, or through lactic acid fermentation enabled by addition of common salt. The pickles also have various combinations of Indian spices and often oil to preserve them for a long time. Available all over India.


In India, chutney refers to any condiment, though in the U.S. it is normally known as a sweet mango sauce. This mango chutney recipe is both sweet and spicy. Usually served alongside main dishes or with pappadums — a thin, crisp Indian cracker. Available all over India.


Also known as Papad in Northern India is a thin, crisp disc-shaped Indian food typically based on a seasoned dough made from black gram (urad flour), fried or cooked with dry heat. Papadams are typically served as an accompaniment to a meal in India, or as an appetizer or snack, sometimes with toppings such as chopped onions, chopped carrots, chutneys or other dips and condiments. Available mostly in North India.

Main Course

20. BHAPA ILISH

Bengalis would die for this traditional fish curry made in mustard paste and their favorite Hilsa fish. If not properly cooked, the gravy could be bitter. Usually served with steamed rice, found best in Kolkata.

21. Sarson ka Saag with Makke ki Roti

This dish made from mustard leaves vegetable (Sarson) and usually had with corn bread (Makke ki Roti) is a traditional Punjabi favorite. Huge chunks of ghee or Indian butter often accompany this deadly veggie combination.

22. BAINGAN KA BHARTA

Roasted eggplant mashed together with a variety of other vegetables and spices, served with flatbread.

23. DAL-BAATI-CHURMA

This Rajasthani specialty consists of a lentil (dal) preparation to go with a kind of hard bread (baati) cooked in a traditional oven and a kind of ground-wheat food called Churma cooked with sugar in Indian butter (Ghee). Too fatty but too tasty.

24. TANDOORI CHICKEN

One of the very popular Indian delicacy, tandoori chicken is just the roasted chicken marinated in yoghurt and spices slow cooked in a very high temperature of the traditional oven called the tandoor.

25. ROGAN JOSH

One of the staples from the Kashmiri cuisine, rogan josh is an Indian curry with boneless lamb cooked in a mixture of caramelized shallots, yoghurt and other spices, chiefly the Kashmiri red chilies which give the dish its characteristic red color.

26. HYDERABADI MUTTON BIRYANI

An aromatic rice dish slow cooked in sealed containers with several spices, saffron, and chicken or mutton that’s been marinated. Available throughout India with many variants, but make sure you don’t miss this out.

27. MASALA DOSA

A crispy paper-thin pancake, flat bread (similar to a crepe) made of rice batter and filled with mashed potato, served with a lentil sauce (sambar) and a variety of chutney. Although found throughout India, but tastes best in southern states of India where it originated specially Karnataka & Tamil Nadu.

This is simply the Indian answer to Pizza. Uttapams are quite similar to dosas, but much thicker, denser and stuffed with onions, tomatoes. They’re usually served with sambar and chutney.

29. Macher jhol (Fish in Tomato):

If you are a fish lover you can’t miss Macher Jhol or fish in tangy tomato based gravy. Tempered in mustard and cumin seeds, lends good blend of flavours to sweet river fish. To be eaten with steamed rice. Only found best in West Bengal.

30. Butter Chicken

Chicken marinated overnight in yoghurt and spices mixture and cooked with a special Makhani (Butter) sauce, tomato puree and spices that gives the dish its unique flavor. It is one of the most popular dishes among non vegetarians throughout the World and the pride of Punjabi cuisine. Surely a belly buster!

31. Dal Makhani

This is the signature delicacy from Punjab in which lentils and beans traditionally cooked overnight in a tangy masala with dollops of fresh cream added to give the rich finishing touch.

32. Malai Kofta

Malai refers to cream and the kofta are deep-fried veggie balls together blend in a creamy Indian saucy curry. More of a North Indian speciality which is the vegetarian version of the famous meatball curries.

33. Rajasthani Gatte ki Sabzi

Gatte ki sabzi is a dish that you can never miss out when you have Rajasthani meal consisting of gram flour cubes in vegetable curry.

India’s version of a sampler platter — is a great way to try several items at once. Availabe throughout India with different variants like North Indian Thali, South indian Thali etc.

Indian Breads

35. Naan / Parantha

Naan or Paratha are most popular varieties of Indian flatbreads where Naan is oven baked and Paratha is made by whole wheat flour on iron board.

Parathas are usually stuffed with vegetables like reddish, onion, potato and best eaten with chilled yogurt or pickle or chutney. Indians prefer dipping it in the sauce of the main dish like Butter Chicken unlike the foreigners who eat plainly without any sauce or curry.

36. Rumali Roti

The word “rumal” is Hindi for handkerchief, and this bread resembles one it is large, as thin as cloth, and served folded like a napkin. Good for eating when you need bread but want something lighter than naan.

37. Sheermaal

Sheermal is a saffron-flavored traditional flatbread made probably from Persian influences. It is one of the several rare Lucknow and Hyderabadi delicacies in India which is mildly sweet Naan baked in tandoor or oven. A must have item in Muslim functions, mainly found in and around Lucknow.

Desserts

38. GAJAR KA HALWA

A desert made with carrots (gajar), milk, ghee and sugar, and served with lots of dry fruits, mainly sliced almonds. Although available all through year but tastes best in winters with fresh seasonal carrots.

39. MISHTI DOI

Hailing from West Bengal, this frozen yogurt dessert is sweetened with jaggery and stored in earthenware pots enabling evaporation of water through its pores thickening the end result and cooling it at the same time.

40. GULAB JAMUN

Small deep-fried balls of dried milk, slow cooked and boiled in sugar syrup. This dessert with a scoop of non-Indian vanilla ice cream is worth a try.

41. RASGULLA

This sweet dish from West Bengal is a national favorite. It is prepared by cooking dumplings made from a kind of Indian cottage cheese in sugar syrup, and served chilled.

42. KULFI (Indian Ice Cream)

Kulfi is an Indian ice cream prepared by prolonged stirring of sweetened flavored milk over flame thus caramelizing the sugar inside the reducing milk and giving it its distinctive smell & taste.

43. RASMALAI

Another sweet from West Bengal, rasmalai includes small spongy disks made from paneer (indian cottage cheese) submerged in saffron flavored cream (malai).

A wheat flour batter deep-fried in coil-shapes and soaked in sugar syrup, served hot. Mainly North Indian favorite breakfast sweet. Must try on your visit to Delhi or Agra.

It is a translucent soft candy which is usually rectangular or cylindrical, it is made from the ash gourd vegetable also known as winter melon or white pumpkin. Agra is World famous for different flavoured varieties of Petha which includes Grape Petha, Choclate Petha, Orange Petha etc. No tot be missed when in Agra.

This is a seasonal Rajasthani sweet which is disc-shaped, and made from oil, flour and sugar syrup. There are many varieties of Ghevar, including plain or cream ghevar. Only available in the months of July – August, it is quite popular in the adjoining states of Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Delhi, Gujrat, Madhya Pradesh.

Sweet Rabri is a sweet, condensed milk based dish made by boiling the milk on low heat for a long time until it becomes dense and changes its color to pinkish. Sugar, spices and nuts are added to it to give it flavor. It is chilled and served as dessert.

Ladoo is a ball-shaped sweet popular in Indian Subcontinent made of flour and sugar with other ingredients that vary by recipe. It is often served at festive or religious occasions.

Indian Drinks

49. Lassi – Shakes

This is a popular and traditional Punjabi yoghurt based drink of India which is made by blending yoghurt with water and Indian spices flavored with ground roasted cumin. Sweet lassi is blended with sugar or fruits instead of spices.

50. Aam Panna

is prepared using raw mangoes, sugar and an assortment of spices is an effective remedy for heat exhaustion and heat stroke. It also quenches thirst and prevents the excessive loss of sodium chloride and iron during summer due to excessive sweating. This drink is mainly consumed in the Northern part of the India and is considered beneficial in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. So all those suffering from Delhi Belly, can drink it for the cure. This drink is also a good source of vitamin B1 and B2 and contains sufficient quantity of niacin, and since it is prepared from raw mangoes it is an excellent source of vitamin C also.

51. Shikanji (Indian Lemonade)

This is a type of traditional lemonade from North India. While the base ingredients include lemon or lime juice, ginger juice, ice and water, shikanji often contains other ingredients such as salt, saffron and cumin.

Chewing the mixture of areca nut and betel leaf is a tradition, custom or ritual which dates back thousands of years from India to the Pacific. It is the preparation of betel leaf combined with areca nut and/or cured tobacco. Paan is chewed and finally spat out or swallowed. Mainly acts as a mouth freshener after meals if taken without tobacco. Available throughout India.

So this was the extensive list of 52 best Indian food dishes to try that you can’t miss in India.


5. Unagi

Unagi is freshwater eel. It isn&rsquot to be confused with anago which is saltwater or conger eel.

To prepare unagi, the eel is cut open and its head and bones are removed. The meat is then skewered and broiled before being slowly grilled over charcoal while being basted with a kabayaki sauce (sweet soy sauce).

Grilled unagi is commonly served in sushi form, or over a bed of rice in a dish called unagi donburi or unadon for short.

One of the best unagi dishes you can try in Japan is hitsumabushi. It refers to a Nagoya specialty of grilled unagi over rice that&rsquos eaten in three stages.

Unagi is served in a bowl over rice with a side of yakumi (condiments) and dashi. The first stage involves eating the eel over rice as is.

After you&rsquove had a few bites, you then mix the yakumi into your bowl in the second stage. The type of yakumi varies between restaurants but they typically include ingredients like wasabi, pickled vegetables, nori, and green onion.

When you&rsquore down to your last few bites, you pour the dashi (sometimes tea) into your bowl and finish the rest. It&rsquos a fun way of eating unagi that isn&rsquot as common as unadon or unagi sushi.

No matter how it&rsquos served, unagi is one of my favorite Japanese foods. Smokey and savory-sweet with great texture, it&rsquos something you need to have when you visit Japan.


MORE: The Only Burger Grilling Guide You’ll Ever Need

"My husband and I have a whole rotation of dinner recipes that we cycle through on repeat, ranging from my mom’s passed-down instructions for homemade Italian meatballs to chicken tacos that are my spouse’s own creation.

But one dish we never, ever get sick of no matter how often we eat it is this roasted tomato soup with grilled cheese from Iowa Girl Eats—usually stuffed with avocado slices to make it extra filling and delicious. The soup itself is crazy easy to make, but I’ll simmer up a batch on Sundays to stockpile for the week, so it only takes minutes to reheat while we slap together the sandwich on the stovetop night of."

Cristina Velocci, Managing Editor

"I basically re-create a Blue Apron meal for spiced pork chops with a few modifications. To start, you'll need: two boneless, center-cut pork chops, two scallions, a Granny Smith apple, a couple of sweet potatoes, a lime, cilantro, and some Mexican spices, plus some greens to sauté on the side. Check out the full directions below—they look long and complex, but it's totally worth it."

Hilary George-Parkin, Fashion Editor

Boil a pot of water and preheat your oven to 425, then cut the peppers in half and remove the stem, ribs, and seeds—wash your hands a lot afterward, trust me on this—toss the peppers with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and place them cut sides down on a sheet pan. Roast them for 18 to 20 minutes, until they’re charred on the top and tender.

Right after you put them in, prep the scallion: leave the white bottoms whole and thinly slice the green tops. When the peppers have about 10 minutes left in the oven, add the white bottoms of the scallions, tossing them in olive oil and salt and pepper first.

Next, cut the sweet potato into medium-sized cubes and boil for about 14 to 16 minutes. When they seem soft enough to mash, drain the water and return the potatoes to the pot. Add butter—or milk! or coconut oil! up to you—and salt and pepper and mash away. I like to make extra and use throughout the next few lunches and dinners.

Next up: pork chops. If you haven’t cooked them before, don’t worry, they’re less intimidating than they seem. Pat them dry with paper towels, season them with salt, pepper, and Mexican spices— ideally chile powder, ground cumin, and ground coriander— and sauté them on medium-high for 2 to 4 minutes per side.

When the pork chops are done and resting on a plate somewhere warm, heat up two teaspoons of olive oil and a couple cloves of minced garlic and then add your greens to the pan—I slice a bunch of collard greens into strips and then add them a minute or so after the garlic.

Final step: the salsa. Your poblanos and scallions are no doubt all charred and delicious-looking by now, and hopefully cool enough to handle, so chop them up into smallish pieces. Then, core and small dice the apple, and chop up as much cilantro leaves as you’d like, using both the leaves and stems.

Put all of that in a bowl with the green tops of the scallions, add a tiny bit of olive oil and some salt and pepper, and you’re good to go. Now, you can plate the dish—add the pork chops, sweet potato, and greens, and spoon the salsa on top. Now, eat! (Or Instagram first—no judgment.)"

"This kimchi rice bowl recipe is so damn simple and delicious, and the best part about this dinner is that you can sub in whatever ingredients you like.

Start with k imchi, b rown rice, d ried seaweed nori, and a s oft-boiled egg optional add-ons include s almon, a vocado, and s autéed kale or spinach.

Make brown rice or grab a to-go side of rice from your local Chinese or Japanese restaurant—so cheap. If you feel like adding salmon or any other sautéed veggies, just fry them up in a pan with some oil—it doesn’t have to be fancy. I usually sprinkle sea salt and cracked pepper on top.

At the same time, get a soft-boiled egg going—once the water in a pot is full-on boiling, carefully drop in an egg and set the timer for exactly 6 minutes. When the timer is up, immediately transfer the egg into cold water and peel the shell.

Place a generous scoop of rice, a side of kimchi, green veggies and/or salmon and/or avocado into a bowl. Soft-boiled egg goes on top. Then, mix it all up and enjoy the rice bowl with dried seaweed!"

Jinnie Lee, Editorial Producer

"Useless fact about me that you probably don’t need to know: My nickname among my group of friends is Chicken, a name that started on a recent vacation where they collectively started noticing how excited I’d get over chicken dishes on menus—something most people do not do.

Naturally, Chicken cooks a lot of chicken—always organic, free-range, and hormone-free—and I’m partial to the absurdly easy tequila lime kabobs on weeknights from Gimme Some Oven.

It takes 20 minutes to cook and includes plenty of black pepper, cumin, lime, cilantro and legit tequila. I sometimes soak my chicken in buttermilk beforehand, which really tenderizes the meat and makes it crazy-juicy I’ve also been known to make these guys as appetizers when entertaining, or bring them to people’s houses for parties—always a hit."

Perrie Samotin, Editorial Director

“I’m a terrible cook. Actually, I can’t be too sure that I’m a terrible cook because I’ve barely even tried. It’s probably more accurate to say that I hate cooking, food preparation, and the inevitable cleanup after making a meal, so it’s rare you will find me in the kitchen.

Fortunately, my boyfriend does know his way around the kitchen—I’ve never even turned my oven on, true story—and enjoys making healthy meals for us both. On the odd occasion that I do help out with anything other than the dishes, we keep it really simple—a grilled white fish recipe like this halibut with tomato avocado salsa from Foodie Crush. I chop and dice, he does the rest."

Jasmine Garnsworthy, Editor

"I didn’t cook a damn thing up until six months ago, when I decided that if I wanted to get domesticated, a masterful understanding of the nuances of Seamless wasn’t going to cut it.

Because I do nothing halfway, I’ve since made everything from a whole-wheat pappardelle with oyster mushrooms and Taleggio to a massive banana cake with cream cheese frosting.

But I always fall back on chicken thighs, particularly the kind that can be prepared quickly and then left to do their thing in the oven while I … watch "Broad City"? Stare at the floor? Drink half a bottle of wine?

Doesn’t matter, because this incredibly good braised chicken dish from The New York Times, with its bright, lemony flavor that cuts right through the richness of the chicken skin—don’t even think about going skinless—and the saltiness of the olives, is impossible to fuck up."

Rachel Krause, Beauty Editor

"When I'm too tired or uninventive to try a new recipe, this healthy and satisfying spinach and tomato pasta is my go-to:

Boil half a box of spinach rotini pasta. While pasta is cooking, combine sliced chicken sausage, baby spinach, and cherry tomatoes in a saucepan with a couple tablespoons of olive oil. Begin to sauté on medium heat, keeping an eye on pasta. When pasta is al dente, remove from heat, drain, and set aside in a covered pot.

When the spinach in your saucepan is wilted and a few of the tomatoes have burst, remove from heat and toss with pasta. Top with a sprinkle of mozzarella cheese and serve hot."


Fruit and Nut Fudge--Low Carb and Gluten-Free

Blogger: Carolyn Ketchum from All Day I Dream About Food Carolyn Says: I love the idea of chocolate stuffed with nuts and dried fruits, and as long as you have my low carb sweetened condensed milk, some nuts and some of my sugar-free dried cranberries on hand, you can make this recipe in a matter of minutes. Recipe: Fruit and Nut Fudge--Low Carb and Gluten-Free

Meet our Raisin Ambassadors. These ladies have been hard at work finding (and cooking) the best raisin recipes out there. From cookies to salads and biscuits, they have it all. These are our favorite recipes to curb our raisin cravings. Look through our list and choose yours.