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Negroni Bacon

Negroni Bacon

Try this Negroni Bacon recipe

Negroni. The recipe is courtesy of Tango & Stache, a pop-up culinary experience in San Francisco.

Ingredients

  • 1 pork belly, whole
  • 1/2 gallon water
  • 4 Cups kosher salt
  • 2 Cups sugar
  • 1/4 Cup juniper berries
  • 1/4 Cup black peppercorns
  • 10 bay leaves
  • 1 bottle Campari
  • 1 bottle gin
  • 1 bottle vermouth

Servings6

Calories Per Serving997

Folate equivalent (total)5µg1%


Oven-baked rigatoni pasta with mozzarella and bacon

This oven-baked rigatoni and mozzarella recipe makes a quick and easy weekday solution.

Ingredients List
320 g pasta
200 g cow’s milk mozzarella cheese
200 g pureed tomato
120 g Negroni pancetta
40 g parmesan
2 spoonfuls of extra virgin olive oil
Thyme
Oregano
Salt

Alla gricia” is not the only way to enjoy this type of pasta: oven-baked rigatoni pasta with stringy mozzarella cheese, flavoured with bacon and herbs, is a delicious treat. The recipe is quick and easy and can solve many a meal-time dilemma, even on a weekday. Oven-baked pasta is one of the great traditions of Italian cuisine. When you serve up a dish of baked rigatoni with mozzarella, everyone will be happy and full of praise for your cooking skills. This dish is so simple to make that it is practically impossible to do anything wrong. The cheesy sauce makes this an ideal first course to serve for Sunday lunch. Then, if there is any left over, oven-baked rigatoni with mozzarella is even better the next day for lunch in the office.

Here’s how to make oven-baked rigatoni with mozzarella cheese.

Start by putting a pan of water on the heat to boil. In the meantime, chop up the mozzarella into fairly large pieces and leave it to drain in a sieve. Toss the chopped bacon in a fairly hot frying pan before adding the pureed tomato sauce and reducing the heat. Mix for as long as necessary and then season the ingredients, but remove from the heat as soon as the sauce starts to dry out. When the water comes to the boil, add salt, mix and throw in the rigatoni. At this point, put the oven on at a setting of 200°. Strain the rigatoni when they are still very “al dente” (still very firm to the bite), about half the cooking time indicated on the packet, and then pour the pasta into an oven dish greased with extra virgin olive oil. Dress the pasta with the tomato and bacon sauce, add a little oregano, thyme and just 20g of grated parmesan, finally add the mozzarella and give everything a stir. Sprinkle the pasta with the remaining parmesan cheese and bake in the oven for 15 minutes. If the pasta starts to brown excessively on top, cover with tinfoil.


Mini potato, Robiola and bacon quiches

A fast and easy concentration taste: potatoes, cheese and bacon in individual portions.

Ingredients List
4 medium potatoes
1 pack of spicy diced bacon
1 package of Robiola
1 dollop of butter
Half of a leek
2 or 3 slices of cooked ham
pepper to taste
1 egg
1 tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese

For an aperitif with friends, a family dinner or appetizer for Sunday lunch or brunch these mini quiches with potatoes, Robiola and bacon are the perfect choice.

These quiches are fast and very easy to prepare and serve, and are even perfect for those who are less experienced in the kitchen. You can use this recipe for last-minute dinner, replacing the bacon with cured jowlor using speck ham. If you do not have Robiola, a sweet cream cheese or Caciotta can be used, such as Asiago, Fontina or even mozzarella cheese. Have fun making this recipe your own!

Peel the potatoes and cut into cubes, toss them into a pot full of water and bring to a boil. Blanch the potatoes for 5 minutes and drain with a slotted spoon. Chop the leek and sauté in a pan with butter, then add the diced bacon and toast, add the diced potatoes and sauté all together with a pinch of salt and pepper. Let cool, pouring into an adequately sized glass or ceramic container.

At this point, pre-heat the oven at 180°. Meanwhile, beat the egg and knead with Robiola and Parmesan, then mix in the other ingredients in order to obtain a homogeneous mixture. Fill the silicone molds, pressing lightly with a spoon in order to obtain a compact quiche. Bake for 10 - 15 minutes.

As decoration, use the slices of ham cut into strips and, if there is any left, a little bit of leek cut lengthwise.


Maple-candied bacon

If you invited me to a cocktail party, I’d bring this.

slathered in pure maple syrup with a crisp, candied crust.

It takes only 5 minutes to prepare and 30 minutes in the oven. I even foil the baking sheet a million times for easy clean up.

Honestly, the hardest part of this recipe is getting the bacon out of the bag.

Maple-candied bacon makes a great hors d’oeuvre (is that how you spell it?) to serve with cocktails.

Any leftover bits can be thrown into salads and of course, there’s always the BLT.

Just a little warning my friends… these candied beauties are hard to resist!


Pasta With Chickpeas and a Negroni

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews. Prop Stylist: Paige Hicks.

This is a no-recipe recipe, a recipe without an ingredients list or steps. It invites you to improvise in the kitchen.

A drink before dinner? Make a Negroni, then pasta with chickpeas and tomato sauce. First, the Negroni: one part gin, one part sweet vermouth, one part Campari, stirred with ice then strained over ice and garnished with orange peel. Sip! Then peel and chop an onion and sauté it in olive oil with a few cloves of smashed garlic and a spray of salt and pepper. Have another hit of Negroni. When the mixture has just started to brown, add a tablespoon of tomato paste and a 28-ounce can of chopped tomatoes, along with a stick of cinnamon. Stir and simmer away for 10 minutes or so, longer if you can, then add enough cream or half-and-half so that the sauce turns softer in color, running to pink.

Meanwhile, boil some salted water and prepare your favorite pasta (I like shells for this application) until it is just al dente. Drain, then toss in a 14-ounce can of drained chickpeas and stir the whole thing into the tomato sauce, topping with chopped parsley and a sprinkle of red-pepper flakes. Finish that Negroni. Eat.

Sam Sifton features a no-recipe recipe every Wednesday in his What to Cook newsletter. Sign up to receive it. You can find more no-recipe recipes here.


Curing meats such as homemade bacon, ham, or pastrami is fun and the results are often better than store bought. But curing is very different from any other recipe because you are using a preservative, sodium nitrite. You must read and thoroughly understand my article on the Science Of Curing Meats before attempting to cure meat or before you ask any questions.

Note: This is a recipe for simple, basic all-American bacon.

In case you have been hibernating, I’m here to tell you that smoked bacon has permeated everything from chocolate to mayonnaise. Unworthy is the upscale bar that doesn’t have a cocktail with a bacon swizzle stick. There’s a National Bacon Day and even Burger King bacon-ized a dessert. But until you’ve tasted real honest to goodness old fashioned, sweet, smoky, umami laden, real American-style homemade bacon, you’ve never really tasted it at its fullest. And now we’re going to provide you with the tools to make amazing homemade bacon!

Pork belly

In parallel to bacon’s rise, pork belly, from which American bacon is made, has moved from Asian menus to mainstream menus across the nation. The major difference between the two is that bacon is cured with a lot of salt, slightly sweet, and smoked, while belly is often just rubbed or marinated, and roasted without the smoke.

But when it comes to both, there’s room for a lot of creativity, and the lines are blurring. Check out this page for our glossary of all the different types of bacon around the world, including buckboard bacon, guanciale, lardons, and pancetta.

Pre-made bacon

Although there are more and more artisanal bacon producers making killer (expensive) bacon out there, almost all the stuff in the grocery stores is made by huge manufacturers taking shortcuts designed to get the stuff onto the market as fast and cheaply as possible. That’s because, sadly, most shoppers see bacon as a commodity. As consumers, we reinforce this behavior when we shop by price alone. Even the labels with boutiquey names (like Farmer John) are usually made by the big mass producers (Hormel).

Homemade bacon is surprisingly easy and the results are quantum leaps better than the stuff from large commercial producers. Once you have the basic recipe down, you can vary the ingredients to make a flavor profile to suit your taste. It is a simple two-step process: (1) curing, and (2) smoking.

But pay attention to the raw material. Check out the notes below for important tips on ordering the meat for American style bacon.

Variations

This is a homemade bacon recipe that produces amazing results every time. But my favorite is Maple Bacon, essentially the same process but with pure maple syrup. The Maple Bacon recipe also has a cool video of the entire process of making homemade bacon. Or try Asian Style Bacon made with honey, hoisin, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, and Sriracha. Soooo good.


A Negroni is the bacon of cocktails

There is a rule in my house: if I ever make a Negroni for myself and Victoria is home, I have to make one for her, too. Every time. This rule was put in place more than two years ago, and never once has it been broken, never turned down, never exceptioned. There is only one other such mandate between us, in the case of bacon. That’s the Negroni. It’s the bacon of cocktails. Like bacon, (1) it is always great, and (2) I’m never not in the mood for it.

So, first things first — what is a Negroni? I’m not going to spend too much time on the history, but briefly: from the moment Campari was invented in 1860, it’s had a heedless love for sweet vermouth. Somewhere along the line, some genius (perhaps Gaspare Campari himself) united them with a little soda water and created the Americano, still the greatest pre-meal cocktail ever made. And the story goes that in 1919, Count Camillo Negroni walked into the Caffe Casoni in Florence and ordered an Americano with gin instead of soda water. He took one sip, lightning struck in the same spot three times, Jesus appeared on a biscotti, and the Negroni cocktail was born.

The Negroni

  • 1 oz gin
  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1 oz sweet vermouth
  • Stir and serve either on ice or up. Garnish with an orange slice or peel.

Almost no one specifies types of gin or vermouth, and in a way, it’s not vital — one of the charms of the Negroni is its near invincibility. Use any gin or sweet vermouth you like and it’s going to taste great. Substitute Campari with any of its competitors and it’s going to taste great. Understir it, overstir it, add orange bitters, screw up the measurements, carbonate it, age it in barrels, do whatever you want to it, and it’ll still be great. It’s great for men or women, first dates or business meetings, after dinner, before dinner, before breakfast, on the train, in outer space, anywhere, always, forever. It’s bitter, it’s sweet, it’s perfect. It is one of the handful of mixed drinks that enjoys universal respect in this industry.

I get it: no one looks for the best Negroni because saying “best Negroni” is a little like saying “best orgasm” — yeah, there are shades of difference there, some better than others, but even a terrible one is still better than almost everything else in the world. But. If you could have the best one every time, wouldn’t you?

And so, our question: what’s best? What gin, what vermouth, what combination? These are my guiding principles:

(1) Campari. Bartenders are a tinkery bunch, which is mostly a good thing, but here, we’re sticking with Campari. Yes, a Cynar/Aperol/Cappelletti/etc Negroni is a fine drink, but a true Negroni has to be made with Campari.

(2) Sweet Vermouth. Not dry vermouth, not bianco vermouth, not barolo chinato (which is like double-dutch heaven), but sweet vermouth. The red kind. Because that’s what’s in it.

(3) Gin. It’s made with gin. For the love of God. Not mezcal, not aquavit, not genever, not barrel-aged gin. Gin.

(4) Equal Parts. A Negroni is equal parts Gin, Sweet Vermouth, and Campari. Yes, it comes with a bit of sweetness. Deal with it. The sweetness is part of the charm. There’s no adding more gin. That’s blasphemy, and it also doesn’t taste as good.

Identical glasses, identical large (2˝ x 2˝) ice, stirred the same amount of times, tasted double blind by both Victoria and me. As double blind as possible, anyway. Punt e Mes is recognizably darker than the others, but it tastes so different, it’s not like we wouldn’t have known anyway.

Competitors

I chose gins and vermouths that are fairly standard. Yes, obviously I’m only tasting five of each, and yes, I might be missing out on some other brand that makes the Negroni of my dreams.

GIN: Beefeater, Tanqueray, Plymouth Navy Strength, Hendrick’s, and Aviation.

VERMOUTH: Carpano Antica, Punt e Mes, Dolin Rouge, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino, and Martini and Rossi

Check back next week for the results!

Blog: Drinks and Drinking | Post Title: What’s the best gin and vermouth for a Negroni? - Part I | Post Date: August 4, 2014

Author: Jason O’Bryan | From: Normal Heights | Blogging since: 2012


11 Takes on the Negroni

Matt Taylor-Gross This classic cocktail was first created for Count Camillo Negroni in 1919 at Florence’s Café Casoni. Get the recipe for Classic Negroni Jeffrey Morgenthaler, bar manager of Clyde Common in Portland, is known for barrel-aging cocktails and other fancy bartender tricks. But when he throws a party, he makes this lightly bitter, pop-and-pour punch that’s as easy as 1-2-3. Get the recipe for Large-Batch Negroni Sbagliato » Gin and sweet vermouth are bolstered with Suze instead of the usual Campari. Get the recipe for the Count Mast Negroni Cocktail »

Tinegroni

A snack-sized negroni with a savory agave twist from bartender Tristan Willey of Long Island Bar. Get the recipe for Tinegroni »

Broken Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato)

Mixologist David Welch pours this bubbly riff on a negroni at Sunshine Tavern in Portland, Oregon.

Americano

The 19th-century Italian cocktail the Milano-Torino consisted of bitter Campari and Martini sweet vermouth. It is said that American travelers preferred their apéritifs with soda water, so the Milano-Torino with soda became known as the Americano. Beth Dixon, bartender at Pasture in Richmond, Virginia, describes this fun cocktail as the lovechild of a Mai Tai and a Negroni. Get the recipe for Bermuda Hundred »

Contessa

The Contessa, a modern creation of John Gertsen, a bartender at Boston’s Drink, replaces two of the Negroni’s three ingredients: Campari is swapped for the lighter and more orangey Aperol and dry vermouth substitutes for sweet. It’s more like the Negroni’s third cousin than a direct descendant.

Boulevardier Cocktail

In this negroni variation, gin is swapped out for bourbon. Get the recipe for Boulevardier Cocktail »

The Negroni:

So first things first — what is a Negroni?

I’m not going to spend too much time on the history, but briefly: from the moment Campari was invented in 1860, it’s had a heedless love for sweet vermouth.

Somewhere along the line, some genius (perhaps Gaspare Campari himself) united them with a little soda water and created the Americano, still the greatest pre-meal cocktail ever made. And the story goes that in 1919, Count Camillo Negroni walked into the Caffe Casoni in Florence and ordered an Americano with gin instead of soda water. He took one sip, lightning struck in the same spot three times, Jesus appeared on a biscotti, and the Negroni cocktail was born (unless it wasn’t. See Trivia, at bottom).

Look anywhere for the recipe for a Negroni and you’ll find the same thing, more or less everywhere, from more or less everyone:

The Negroni
1oz gin
1oz Campari
1oz Sweet Vermouth
Stir, and serve either on ice or up. Garnish with an orange slice or peel.

Almost no one specifies types of gin or vermouth, and in a way, it’s not vital — one of the charms of the Negroni is it’s near invincibility. Use any gin or sweet vermouth you like, and it’s going to taste great. Substitute Campari for any of it’s competitors, and it’s going to taste great. Understir it, overstir it, add orange bitters, screw up the measurements, carbonate it, age it in barrels, do whatever you want to it, and it’ll still be great. It’s great for men or women, first dates or business meetings, after dinner, before dinner, before breakfast, on the train, in outer space, anywhere, always, forever. It’s bitter, it’s sweet, it’s perfect. It is one of the handful of mixed drinks that enjoys universal respect in this industry.

But that’s my problem. I get it, no one looks for the best Negroni because saying “best Negroni” is a little like saying “best orgasm” — yeah, there are shades of difference there, some better than others, but even a terrible one is still better than almost everything else in the world. But. If you could have the best one every time, wouldn’t you?

And so, our question: what’s best? What gin, what vermouth, what combination?


Frozen Blood Orange Negroni

  • egg-free
  • kidney-friendly
  • peanut-free
  • low-potassium
  • pork-free
  • pescatarian
  • gluten-free
  • tree-nut-free
  • low-sodium
  • red-meat-free
  • low-fat
  • dairy-free
  • fish-free
  • vegetarian
  • shellfish-free
  • vegan
  • sugar-conscious
  • no-oil-added
  • soy-free
  • wheat-free
  • Calories 101
  • Fat 0.1 g (0.1%)
  • Saturated 0.0 g (0.1%)
  • Carbs 4.8 g (1.6%)
  • Fiber 0.1 g (0.3%)
  • Sugars 3.7 g
  • Protein 0.3 g (0.6%)
  • Sodium 9.9 mg (0.4%)

Ingredients

For the cocktail:

freshly squeezed blood or navel orange juice (about 1 1/2 blood oranges)

Fresh thyme sprigs, for garnish

Instructions

In a blender, combine the gin, Campari, sweet vermouth, and blood orange juice. Add ice and blend, starting on the lowest setting and increasing to the highest setting. Add more ice if you desire a thicker consistency. Pour the frozen Negroni into chilled glasses and garnish with a sprig of thyme or an orange wheel.

Recipe Notes

If you can, use crushed ice. Your cocktail will blend easier and make a smoother drink. If you can't find crushed ice, make your own by wrapping ice cubes in a kitchen towel and smashing them with a meat tenderizer or mallet.

Take the time to pre-chill your spirits and juice, so that the ice remains cold and doesn't quickly dilute the drink when you mix it.

Prefer a less boozy version? Simply add a touch more ice and a splash more blood orange juice.

Blood oranges not in season? Oranges or ruby red grapefruits make a great substitution.

Jayme is an aspiring wine-maker and Certified Sommelier, and when away from the restaurant, she can be found in the garden or the kitchen. She blogs at Holly & Flora, where she writes about cultivating, cocktailing, and creating, from garden to glass.


Watch the video: 3 x NEGRONI Variations for Negroni Week! (October 2021).